Mourning Francisco González Gragera, creator of Capricho de Cotrina

Close
Jennifer Joy Jameson

Posts by Jennifer Joy Jameson 16 Items

communications@spacesarchives.org

Conservator-in-Residence Position, Hartman Rock Garden - Ohio

Posted in Preservation News
indexphoto2Image via Hartman Rock Garden.
The Hartman Rock Garden is seeking applications from individuals who wish to gain professional experience in the fields of art history, conservation, history, and museum studies for its eleven-month Conservator-in-Residence position. The position begins May 1, 2017 and concludes March 31, 2018 (dates can be flexible). The selected individual or individuals will reside in the furnished one-bedroom house at the Hartman Rock Garden, where they will work alongside the garden’s strong volunteer base and professional advisors on the maintenance, conservation, and interpretation of the garden. Applications are due Wednesday, January 25, 2017. See the attached document for full details and application information. Questions can be directed to krose@hmturnerfoundation.org. Please forward to students, friends, or colleagues who may be interested.

Learn more about Hartman at www.hartmanrockgarden.org.

See the full job description here: Job Description: Conservator-in-Residence, Hartman Rock Garden

 

Kevin Rose
Historian
The Turner Foundation

Laura Pope Forrester Home + Art Environment on the Market

Posted in Gardens, Threatened Environments

 

A guest post by Ginger Cook of Deep Fried Kudzu, originally seen here.

ga708forresterborrelli008-environmentslideenlarge-1024-1024

 

I was contacted a few months ago by a UGA faculty member for permission to use some of my photographs of the Laura Pope Forrester home in Ochlocknee, Georgia (which I granted) in paperwork to add it as a “Places in Peril” with the National Trust of Historic Preservation.


An entry for Laura Pope Forrester (they spell her surname differently, as it most often appears ‘Laura Pope Forester’) appears in the New Georgia Encyclopedia for her work as a self-taught artist in Ochlocknee who “created one of the state’s first outdoor art environments during the 1940s and 1950s. Her concrete figures, depicting such historical and literary personages as Nancy Hart and Scarlett O’Hara, came to be known as “Mrs. Pope’s Museum.”“

The AP reported on the site in 1961:
One of the most unique museums in the nation, containing more than 200 statues hand-carved by a Mitchell County woman…

Mrs. Forester’s inventiveness was almost as incredible as her talent.  Besides using scrap iron from junkyards, discarded tin cans and other waste material as braces for her statues, she painted the figures with liquids of many flowers and brightly colored berries…

…The sculptress, who created her first statue in 1900, died in 1953, at the Pope mansion in which she was born.  The museum is sponsored by a civic club and the Chamber of Commerce.

Two hundred life-size statues…plus she painted, including painting directly on her home.  In the early ’80s, the owner of the house reportedly had the statues destroyed in fewer than 48 hours.  A witness to what was left later records: “I remember going out behind the house and seeing just piles of faces and hands and such…”  

The author of ‘A Palpable Elysium: Portraits of Genius and Solitude’ includes a quote from the owner who arranged for the destruction as saying, “They had done passed their days of bein’ useful. So we’ve taken down just about all of ‘em.”

The author writes:
Based on the evidence that remains, this is one of the worst pieces of unconscious vandalism that one has ever heard of. How could the museums and historical societies and university art departments and collectors of the state of Georgia — or just local citizens with eyes in their heads — have allowed this destruction to take place?
—-


The home’s been on the market for a few months, and the price has been lowered to $153k. The photographs on the realtor.com listing don’t show the artwork out front, and doesn’t make any notation about it. Hopes are to have the site preserved, as some of the previous owners destroyed statuary. 

Sam Gappmayer Appointed New Director of the John Michael Kohler Arts Center

Posted in Self-Taught Arts in the News

jcr-content

The morning of Sept. 30, 2016, the Board of Directors of the John Michael Kohler Arts Center announced the hiring of Sam Gappmayer as the new Director of the Sheboygan, WI, arts organization. Gappmayer, who currently serves as President and CEO of the Peoria Riverfront Museum, will assume his new position October 17.

Gappmayer has 27 years of experience heading multidisciplinary arts organizations throughout the United States. Prior to the Peoria Riverfront Museum, he worked as the top executive at the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, and at the Sun Valley Center for the Arts in Ketchum, ID. Gappmayer earned a Master of Arts in art history from the University of Oregon and a Bachelor of Arts in fine arts from Montana State University.

“I have admired the work of the John Michael Kohler Arts Center and Ruth DeYoung Kohler, its longtime Director, for most of my career,” stated Gappmayer. “Vital and relevant programming in multiple artistic disciplines, the unique Arts/Industry program, and the focus on art environment builders sets the Arts Center apart as an important contributor to a healthy arts culture on local, regional, and national levels.”

Ruth DeYoung Kohler served as the Arts Center’s Director since 1972, and in January, she transitioned to the role of Director Emerita and Director of Strategic Initiatives. In 2015, she was honored with the Visionary Award from the American Folk Art Museum in New York City, and she received the Wisconsin Visual Art Lifetime Achievement Award in 2007.

“I have deep admiration for all that Ruth Kohler, the staff, board and donors have accomplished in building and expanding the reach of the Arts Center over many years and feel honored to become part of this dedicated creative community,” commented Gappmayer. “It is my intention to continue to enhance and extend the mission of this very special institution.”

John Michael Kohler Arts Center Board President Sandra Sachse said, “The board of directors believes that Sam has the skills and experience to continue the unique vision of the John Michael Kohler Arts Center as we go forward into the future. We welcome him and his wife, Ann, to our community.”

In 2017, the John Michael Kohler Arts Center will celebrate its 50th year as a leader in innovative explorations of the arts. Its programming is distinguished by original, thematic exhibitions; cutting-edge music and dance performances; commissions of collaborative community works of art; and a highly respected arts-based preschool. The Arts Center’s anniversary will be celebrated with a yearlong series of exhibitions featuring its world-renowned collection of works by art-environment builders. The Arts Center is also in the planning phase for construction of the Art Preserve, a facility that will provide state-of-the-art storage and display of its extensive collection.

About the John Michael Kohler Arts Center: Founded in 1967, the John Michael Kohler Arts Center is dedicated to making innovative arts programming accessible to a broad audience that ranges from artists and academics to families and youth of all ages. Central to its mission is promoting understanding and appreciation of the work of self-taught and contemporary artists through original exhibitions, commissioned works of art, performing arts programs, community arts initiatives, and publications. The Arts Center’s collections focus primarily on works by vernacular-environment builders, self-taught and folk artists, and works created in the Arts/Industry residency program.

Looking to the future, the Arts Center continues to generate new explorations in the arts that foster creative exchanges between an international community of artists and a diverse public, making real the power of the arts to transform lives and strengthen communities. The John Michael Kohler Arts Center is supported by corporate and foundation donors, government grants, and its many members. The Arts Center is not an entity of Kohler Co. or its subsidiaries. More information about the Arts Center can be found at jmkac.org.

Grand Re-Opening of St. EOM's Pasaquan on Oct. 22 in Georgia

Posted in Preservation News



eombeard-environmentslideenlarge-1024-1024St. EOM. Photo courtesy Fred C. Fussell.

Pasaquan opens to the public on October 22, 2016 after two years of structural repairs and intense art conservation work. As Eddie Owens Martin, known as St. EOM, would say, the past, present, and future all come together at Pasaquan. And, indeed, they have.

Kohler Foundation was contacted by noted folklorist Fred Fussell of Columbus, Georgia on behalf of the Pasaquan Preservation Society more than ten years ago. The group cared for the site for over two decades, caring for it to the best of their ability but with limited resources. Pasaquan was always of interest to Kohler Foundation, and when Fred made that initial call, it was discussed, but the request was declined. Kohler Foundation was engaged in other preservation projects at the time, and frankly, the project was daunting given the deteriorating conditions and the magnitude of the site.

pasapan2-environmentslideenlarge-1024-1024BEFORE. Photo by Fred Scruton, 2011.

A decade later, when Fred called again, Kohler Foundation was seeking a major project and in the ensuing ten years, we had finished several major projects, including the Garden of Eden in Lucas, Kansas. Over the years, we pulled together an amazing team of objects conservators and painting conservators who we trusted and who we knew could do the job. International Artifacts from Houston and Los Angeles, with technicians brought in from Kansas and Wisconsin, handled the structural issues with the art. Parma Conservation of Chicago took on the massive job of color matching, testing, and painting. These two conservation firms worked well as a team and benefited from local talent and interns from the University of Wisconsin and Columbus State University.

screen-shot-2016-10-16-at-121959-pmAFTER. Photo courtesy Kohler Foundation, 2016.

A local contractor, T.G. Gregory of Columbus, Georgia, was hired as general contractor. Tim’s crew proved to be exceptional problem solvers and highly skilled craftsmen. They did a superb job renovating and making the buildings functional and sound. With a keen understanding of preservation work, Tim’s group fit in well with the art conservation team, each with their own role, but guiding, helping and contributing to one another along the way.

Pasaquan is Kohler Foundation’s largest and most challenging project to date, but we had a team that worked through it and delivered incredible results.

st-eom-11-environmentslideenlarge-1024-1024 All this was done amid scorching heat and high humidity and constantly dealing with snakes, termites, spiders, and fire ants. Challenges and problems arrived as if by avalanche. Two years of hard work. Sweat and more sweat. Conditions were less than perfect, and there were also budgets and deadlines to be considered. Pasaquan is Kohler Foundation’s largest and most challenging project to date, but we had a team that worked through it and delivered incredible results. 

However, preserving the site is only half the equation. Kohler Foundation never takes on a site without a solid recipient identified to take care of the preserved site into the future. Without someone to care for the art and property, make it accessible to the public, and to offer programing, none of this would make sense. In this case, we were so very fortunate to partner with Columbus State University (Columbus, GA). Forward thinking and appreciative of the arts, CSU is an ideal recipient. Their administration has the courage to step outside the box and they recognize how art can enrich and change people’s lives for the better. They are already taking an interdisciplinary approach and involving other university disciplines to take advantage of this amazing resource and share it with others. Professor Mike McFalls, from CSU’s Art Department, coordinates the site and the programming. We couldn’t have better partners; clearly, what CSU does will continue to impact the region for many years to come.

screen-shot-2016-10-16-at-121934-pm

Pasaquan is located outside of Buena Vista in Marion County, GA, and this small community welcomed Kohler Foundation with open arms. Our team immersed themselves in Buena Vista and we have seen Buena Vista take on the challenge to be ready for the opening of Pasaquan. Their community leaders and state tourism officials recognize that Buena Vista and Marion County have a treasure in their midst. It is heart-warming to see this level of involvement from the local community as they welcome visitors to Pasaquan.



 

For more information contact the Director of Pasaquan, Professor Michael McFalls at mcfalls_michael@columbusstate.edu.

To find out more about the opening events, see details on the Pasaquan website.

 

~ Terri Yoho, Executive Director, Kohler Foundation, Inc.

Call to Action: Preserve Grandma Prisbrey's Bottle Village in California

Posted in Threatened Environments

 

The late “Grandma” Tressa Prisbrey’s Bottle Village, situated in Simi Valley, just north of Los Angeles, California, is one of the boldest and most dynamic art environments ever made by a woman. The incredible, 15-building site is under threat from the elements this winter. Back in 1979, local people formed the non-profit Preserve Bottle Village to acquire and restore the property, which was later damaged in the 1994 Northridge earthquake. 

 

miscrb31314367145889lTressa Prisbrey at the Bottle Village ca. 1981. Photo by Roger Brown.

This winter, Preserve Bottle Village is raising funds via GoFundMe to protect the site from further deterioration due to winter rains, as part of an ongoing overall preservation campaign. Read their call below:

Help protect Simi Valley folk art environment, Bottle Village from winter storm damage.Please support the efforts of Preserve Bottle Village, a non-profit organization made up of a small group of volunteers dedicated to the preservation and conservation of this irreplaceable example of American Folk Art. 

 

One of only a few folk art environments created by a woman, Bottle Village hums with creator Tressa “Grandma” Prisbrey’s unique sense of humor and perspective. “Anyone can do something with a million dollars. Look at Disney,” Prisbrey once said. “But it takes more than money to make something out of nothing, and look at the fun I have doing it.” The self-taught artist started building in 1956, at the age of 60, and worked until 1981. Prisbrey constructed the site’s 15 buildings and many site features using found materials, including tens of thousands of multicolored bottles set in cement mortar. Colorful walkways of broken tiles and crockery wind through the one-third acre site. 

 

Preserve Bottle Village is working on long term restoration plans with ARG Conservation Services, the San Francisco firm that restored Los Angeles’s Watts Towers. In the short term, each of Bottle Village’s structures must be temporarily protected with tarps, plastic sheeting and wooden braces until actual stabilization work may begin. The heavy rains and strong winds of projected El Nino storms add urgency to this work. Your generous donation will help Preserve Bottle Village to safeguard the magical world and rare vision of Grandma Prisbrey for future generations.

Be sure to donate today via their GoFundMe campaign page to help preserve and conserve this special site in Southern California. The effort is led, in part, by Tanya Ward Goodman, the daughter of Tinktertown’s Ross Ward. 

rbprisbreybottlevillage00114232636865lThe Bottle Village. Photo by Roger Brown, ca. 1981.

Finally, head over to Folkstreams to watch Allie Light and Irving Saraf’s excellent 1982 short film on Grandma Prisbrey,  Grandma’s Bottle Village: The Art of Tressa Prisbrey to catch wind of Prisbrey’s wonderful wit, humor, and strength.

 

screen-shot-2015-12-26-at-54023-pmClick on image to take you to the film on Folkstreams.org

 

 

 

 

Mr. Imagination exhibit at Intuit named one of 10 best in the United States

Posted in Self-Taught Arts in the News
unnamed-4Photo courtesy Intuit.

Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art’s Welcome to the World of Mr. Imagination exhibit was recognized as one of the 10 best exhibits in the United States in 2015 by Hyperallergic, an online art forum with global reach.

 

In the article awarding Intuit the eighth spot on the list, Hyperallergic contributor Benjamin Sutton captures the spirit of the exhibit with the line: “Amid all the staffs, thrones, busts, talismans, and religious figures, one felt truly immersed in an alternate universe of boundless optimism and constant celebration-yet not without its share of hardship and pain.” 


Welcome to the World of Mr. Imagination was originally scheduled to be on view at Intuit Jan. 9-April 25, 2015, and then extended through May 24, 2015, due to the exhibit’s popularity. Curated by Martha Henry, this exhibition was the first Chicago retrospective since the death of the artist known as Mr. Imagination (Gregory Warmack, 1948-2012), whose career spanned more than 30 years. Chicago was Mr. Imagination’s hometown and where he developed and matured as an artist. The diverse collection surveyed the nationally-recognized artist’s career, incorporating sculptures, furniture, accessories and his signature bottle cap pieces.

 

“Mr. Imagination was a messenger who preached that the power of art can transform lives and transcend adversity,” notes Henry. “I am gratified that Intuit supported my vision of bringing to life Mr. Imagination’s extraordinary world where art and artist were inseparable.” 

 

 

mr-i-at-home2220267729oPhoto of Mr. Imagination by Kelly Ludwig.

Established in 1991, Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art is the only nonprofit organization in the United States dedicated solely to presenting self-taught and outsider art-with world class exhibitions; resources for scholars and students; a collection of more than 1,100 works of art; the Henry Darger Room Collection; the Robert A. Roth Study Center, a non-circulating collection with a primary focus in the fields of outsider and contemporary self-taught art; and educational programming for people of all interest levels and backgrounds.

 

SPACES readers can view images of work by Mr. Imagination by photographer Kelly Ludwig in our Online Collection HERE. If you are interested in contributing your own images, ephemera, or writing to SPACES Archives regarding this artist and his site, you may submit them HERE

 

Margaret’s Grocery listed as one of Mississippi’s Historic Trust’s 10 Most Endangered Properties!

Posted in Preservation News, Threatened Environments
8619919350396aa27713zMargaret's Grocery in 2013. Photo by Kelly Ludwig.

October brought important news for the preservation of Southern vernacular art environments. On the heels of the nearly-finished Kohler Foundation conservation of St. EOM’s Pasaquan in Buena Vista Georgia, as well as the selection of its first Director, we now turn our attention toward Mississippi. 

On Thursday, October 22nd, the Mississippi Heritage Trust announced Reverend H.D. Dennis’ Margaret’s Grocery in Vicksburg, Mississippi on of 2015’s “10 Most Endangered Properties.” Since the deaths of Mrs. and Mr. Dennis’ in 2009 and 2011, respectively, the roadside market on historic Highway 61 adorned with bright colors and evangelical messages has swiftly decayed at an alarming rate. 

Now that the site is listed as a “10 Most” property, the real preservation advocacy begins. At SPACES, we will make sure to organize and share all public updates on preservation efforts surrounding Margaret’s Grocery, both on the civic and state level, and on the grassroots fundraising level.

For a quick review on recent preservation movement surrounding the site, watch Jennifer Joy Jameson’s 2015 presentation at the NPS-NCPTT’s Divine Disorder conference on the preservation of folk and “outsider” art.

 

Watch 1990s Jarvis Cocker Travel Art Environments All Over the World in This BBC Mini-Series

Posted in Found Objects

 

We recently stumbled upon a vintage gem on the art environment beat:

The English musician Jarvis Cocker, largely known as the frontman of the popular 90s Britpop group Pulp, traveling the world over to visit art environments and meet with the makers behind them in his 1999 three-part television series on BBC 4, “Journeys Into the Outside With Jarvis Cocker.”

Journeys Into the Outside with Jarvis Cocker

 Who better to bring the world of self-taught art to the public than the idiosyncratic performer behind the 1995 hit, “Common People.” In the introduction, Cocker explains his inspiration for the series, in school at London’s St. Martin’s School of Art:

“So desperate to find a spark of inspiration, something that would help to put these feelings into words, I began to scour the college library. There was no shortage of material on offer, but none of it seemed to fit the bill. I needed to find something outside all this, something that had not been analysed to death. And then when I had all but given up hope of such a thing existing, I found it: in a book called Outsider Art.”

 

outsider-art-48outsider-art-3 

“The book was about art made by people from all walks of life, who didn’t think of themselves as artists, but were creating things because they thought they had to, rather than because they had been taught to. Although the book featured paintings and sculptures it was the photographs of unusual buildings and monuments that really caught my imagination. How could there be a gap between art and everyday life, if every day you lived inside the work of art you had created? This was exactly what I was looking for.”

 

 

Part One: FRANCE

Cocker visits each of these art environments. Visit the links to see their page on our SPACES Online Archive:



 Part Two: UNITED STATES 

Cocker visits each of these art environments. Visit the links to see their page on our SPACES Online Archive:

 

outsider-art-29outsider-art-58 

“I’d found much more than just a subject for an essay, I’d found something that I could really get excited about. And I vowed if I ever got the chance, I’d go and find more about these incredible places and the people who’d made them. Now almost a decade later that time has come.”

 

Part Three: INDIAN, MEXICO, BELGIUM, AND SWITZERLAND

Cocker visits each of these art environments. Visit the links to see their page on our SPACES Online Archive:

 

 We hope Jarvis Cocker’s enthusiasm rubs off, and you find yourself on your own “Journey!”

 

Conservation of Chomo’s Village d’art Préludien Begins in France

Posted in Preservation News, Threatened Environments

chomo-at-night-2009-l-danchin-the-church-of-the-poor-img3206

 

Roberta Trapani reporting from France:

The week of July 13, 2015 saw the first stage in the efforts to preserve and restore the late artist Roger Chomeaux (or Chomo)’s Refuge, one of the most important buildings in his Village d’art Préludien, but the one that has suffered the most deterioration over the years. This restoration will develop in two phases: 1) preventative measures taken to arrest further deterioration and decay, to be undertaken during summer 2015 and 2) actual restoration of the Refuge, to be undertaken during summer 2016, if sufficient funds can be raised.

 

Under the direction of Fabrice Azzolin of the École des Beaux-Arts of Nantes, four young students are working on this first phase of the restoration. They first constructed a wooden structure to temporarily protect the Refuge, which is rusting, in order to ensure its security over the coming year. These students lived in Chomo’s Village for around ten days, and just by living there they resuscitated the site and breathed new life into it.

 

The week of July 13, all of those present ate together in the forest, in the middle of Chomo’s Village, in front of the house. The young students had access to the kitchen and they prepared a magnificent meal. In order to do this, they were inspired by Chomo’s sculptures, so they sculpted steamed carrots and other vegetables, and played with other different ingredients in order to create plate-sculptures. Chomo would have adored that! At the end of the meal, the students even improvised a jam session with different musical instruments, including guitar, flute, and harmonica. It was unbelievable to hear such beautiful music in the heart of the forest.  

 

The event, which brought in supporters of Chomo’s Village in addition to the Beaux-Arts contingent, was organized by SPACES Board member Laurent Danchin, who has written widely about Chomo and who has been the leading force in the campaign to save and preserve this important art environment.

 

Sign petition to help save Roberto Pérez’s Spanish art environment!

Posted in SPACES News, Threatened Environments

gaudi

Roberto Pérez has spent more than a quarter century creating a variety of artwork in different media, but his masterpiece is an architectural sculpture in the Spanish province of Granada. This work has been created with stone and recycled materials of all kinds, and  he has become known by many as the “Andalucian Gaudí.”

The Urban Planning Department of the province of Andalucía wants to demolish this work because it does not conform to local building codes. We are fighting their decision. Please sign the petition and pass it on to all your friends and colleagues:

 

Sign at this LINK.

 

Many Thanks,

Jo Farb Hernández, Director

SPACES – Saving and Preserving Arts and Cultural Environments

 

Browse Blog Archives by Month
Highlights

Conservator-in-Residence Position, Hartman Rock Garden - Ohio
Preservation News

SPACES Honors Watts Towers Committee Founding Member Jeanne Smith Morgan on her 90th Birthday!
Preservation News, SPACES News

Remembering Josep Pujiula i Vila (1937-2016)
Just Added, Self-Taught Arts in the News

Dispatch from the Field: Jo Farb Hernández in Spain
Just Added, SPACES News

Materializing the Bible. by James S. Bielo (Miami University)
Gardens, Religious, Devotional & Spiritual

Call to Action: Preserve Grandma Prisbrey's Bottle Village in California
Threatened Environments

Mr. Imagination exhibit at Intuit named one of 10 best in the United States
Self-Taught Arts in the News

SPACES Director to Present Singular Spaces at Madrid’s Reina Sofia Museum
SPACES News

Margaret’s Grocery listed as one of Mississippi’s Historic Trust’s 10 Most Endangered Properties!
Preservation News, Threatened Environments

Watch 1990s Jarvis Cocker Travel Art Environments All Over the World in This BBC Mini-Series
Found Objects

The SPACES website allows you to save your favorite art environments and share them with your friends or colleagues. Create your own portfolio of your favorites from environments in the online collection.

Send them to your friends, post them on Facebook or to your Twitter account!

Look for this button on pages that can be saved:

Add Page to my spaces