Ho Baron's Sculpture Garden(1941)

Status

Extant

Address

2830 Aurora, El Paso, Texas, 79930, United States

Visiting Information

The Sculpture Garden is free and open to the public. It is located at Baron's residence, and daytime visitors may walk into the garden.

About the Artist/Site

Inspired by world travels, religion, literature, and philosophy, Ho Baron (b. 1941) has created an installation in the garden of his home featuring life-size figurative sculptures that “look like deities of an ancient culture pulled from a remote lagoon.” These works fit into his larger body of sculptural work that he has titled “Gods for Future Religions.” As he wrote in a book by the same title, “As a creator myself, as a creative person and an artist, I’ve concluded that I, too, am a god. My sculptures are the godly children to whom I’ve given birth.”

Baron was born in Chicago in 1941 and raised in El Paso, Texas. He focused on literature as a student and earned both a BA and MA in English. Service in the Peace Corps took him abroad to Africa, and he eventually settled in Antwerp, Belgium, in 1970. He eventually returned to the U.S. later that decade and began studying sculpture at the Philadelphia College of Art and then the University of Texas. He also earned a second MA in Library Science and worked part-time as a college librarian, giving him the ability to also pursue his studio practice. 

Baron’s creative practice is expansive, including photography, drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, and writing. He has published two books, Gods for Future Religions: Surreal Sculpture and El Paso: A Hoverview. While he has received some arts education, Baron considers himself to be primarily self-taught, especially in sculpture, and he works intuitively. His primary point of inspiration is the human form which he molds through an abstracted, surrealist lens. Baron says, “Inventing abstract figurative imagery is my calling, and for fifty years I’ve been obsessed with creating surreal narrative bronze and cast stone sculptures, pen and ink drawings, photographs, and most recently assemblages. My joy is in creating whimsical, anthropomorphic creatures that lend themselves to scenario. My art is archetypal, exemplifying Karl Jung's theory of the universal creative unconscious. I model my sculptural imagery intuitively, the forms only dictated by their armatures, instinctually creating motifs that reflect my own unique and personal style.”

Baron’s sculpture garden is open to the public, and daytime visitors are welcome to walk into the garden. For more information, visit his website


This text is adapted from the information presented on www.hobaron.com and this El Paso Herald-Post article.

Contributors

Materials

cast stone and bronze

Map & Site Information

2830 Aurora
El Paso, Texas, 79930 us
Latitude/Longitude: 31.7929297 / -106.4616841

Nearby Environments

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